Skip to content Skip to footer

Submitted by Richard K. Fleischer

Liberty Steel Co. est. May 6, 1918 – Located on Martin Luther King Blvd. (formerly Euclid Ave.) Was built as a tin mill, making tin sheet, a supplier of tin for the government in WWI, and for the Standard Oil Co. Sheet tin was made for containers of food to be sent to U.S. soldiers in Europe. It was also used to make containers for petroleum products. 

There were 3 main buildings. Two housing the mills, a tin house, and an office building. There are 14 tin pots, 8 hot mills, 12 annealing furnaces, and 2 pickling vats. It was projected to be the largest tin mill in the world. (Q). Made tinplate sheets measuring 32 x 84 inches. There were over 700 people employed there. President Clark of Liberty Steel was the son in law of Jonathan Warner, President of Trumbull Steel.

Buildings – tin mill buildings 540 ft. long x 75 ft. wide. Tin house was 450 ft. long x 75 ft. wide. At one time there was a two or three story office building out in the front, but it is gone.

In a Tribune article, this mill was projected to be the world’s largest tin mill. A mill in New Castle, Pa. made the same claim.

Liberty Steel was bought out by Trumbull Steel/ Republic Steel in 1929. It’s operations apparently, folded in the the tin making operations at Republic Steel’s Warren Works. 

Mullins Manufacturing – Bought the building at some point and made steel stampings. Mullins made 105mm artillery shell casings during WWII. Building was later sold to Ohio Fast Freight, a motor carrier. 

Today, there is some kind of environmental business occupying the buildings.

Liberty Steel is also a reference to the entire area off of Martin Luther King Blvd. It was a bustling area at one time and was a part of Leavittsburg. After years of decline, the area asked to be annexed to the City of Warren, which it was, so that residents could have access to city services.