Skip to content Skip to footer

Submitted by Kathy Seemann

In 1806, two years after Bristol Township in Trumbull County, Ohio was first settled by Abraham Baughman, Jonathan Walkley (born in Connecticut on November 11, 1783, died October 19, 1828) built the first frame home in the township on the south side of what is now route 45. He operated it as the first inn for travelers journeying from Pittsburgh through Warren to the lake as a stage coach stop. It was there for over one hundred years, being destroyed by fire. Jonathan is buried in Pioneer Cemetery.

Later a hotel was built in the southwest corner of what is now route 45/88. Calvin W. Huntley operated the hotel from about 1850 to 1865. Calvin was born in Canadaigua, NY June 13, 1813. He operated the hotel for 15 years and died at the age of 94, January 10, 1907. He and his wife Julia A. Fairchild had 13 children, two sons. Scott, born April 22, 1847, and Austin Oscar are buried in Evergreen Cemetery in the township. Scott operated the inn after returning from the Civil War with the 23rd Ohio Infantry until 1883. His brother Austin Oscar took over until he sold in 1892. It was under several ownerships until Earl A. Brockett bought it in August 1903. Brockett built a new hotel at the same site in 1904. It had a spacious veranda, contained 15 rooms for rent, offices, reading and sitting rooms, and a spacious dining room. A large livery was at the rear of the property. Brockett sold the building in 1907. Again, several owners held until 1928 when Adam and Mary Little rented then bought it in 1929. Before buying they had owned a restaurant in Lake Milton, Ohio. By this time, the livery and rooms had been sold separately.

 Adam had been born in Beaver Township, Mahoning County on May 7, 1885. Mary Smith was his second wife. Adam was known as “The Pancake King” until his death in 1947. Mary took over as proprietor and ran for over 30 years. It was during this time in the early 950s that State Route 45 was widened, and Mary had a new foundation built and the building was moved back from the road. During this time, the people of Bristol referred to the inn as “Mary’s.” Mary died in 1984. Both she and Adam are buried in Evergreen Cemetery in the township.

After Mary’s death the Inn was run by grandson Wesley Mahan and in October of 2019 the building was once again destroyed by fire. The building still stands and the original Bristol Inn sign can still be seen.